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Missing Left Sock Beast
sistercoyote
.:: .::...:.. .: : .:::.:. ...


Coyote Musings
Coyote handsome
his coat the same brown
as the dust from which he rises

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What is the sound of one hand slapping Schroedinger's cat?

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The Quantum Duck goes "quark, quark."

September 2010
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Missing Left Sock Beast [userpic]

tearing-hair-out time.

Can anyone tell me if there are specific, set colors in scientific publications for the four DNA proteins (Thymine, Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine)? Please?

Thank you.

Comments

Hmmm... in physics, the color of quarks is usually dependent on the markers available for the overhead projector. Check out the Nature Publishing Group for submission guidelines for papers for the appropriate sort of journal.

I just finished a bio class on the human genome and the color set seemed to be Black, Dark Grey, Medium Grey, and Light Grey With Speckles.

Cheap book, horrid class. But other than that I haven't seen any sort of standard or convention. I don't think there is one.

Yes there is! Um... No there isn't! Erm. Maybe.

Kidding aside...

I've looked around, and there doesn't seem to be an accepted standard. I found four different color schemes very quickly. I looks like they have traditionally been represented by shapes instead of colors.

That said, one site mentions a "DRuMS" color scheme which seems to be someone's attempt to establish a standardized color set, particularly for use on the web. This one seems to be fairly easy:

A - Azure (i.e. Blue)
T - Tweety Bird (i.e. Yellow)
C - Carmine (i.e. Red)
G - Green (i.e. Green)

Sounds as good as any, I suppose.

I did a quick Google search of "color coded" and nucleotides. A brief perusal of the snippets would seem to indicate not.